How To Burn 1000 Calories On A Treadmill

How To Burn 1000 Calories On A Treadmill

It seems like 1000 calories is the magical number that many people aspire to burn when they hit the treadmill at their local gym. But how long do you actually need to run for, if you want to burn 1000 calories on a treadmill?
 
For most people, the answer lies between 5.5 and 8.5 miles. The reason for the variance is mainly due to weight, with lighter people needing to run further in order to burn the same number of calories as a heavier person

The speed that you run also plays a role, but mainly on how long it takes to burn the calories. The faster you run, the less time it takes to hit the 1k calorie mark. Ultimately, these are 4 metrics that matter when doing this calculation. 
 
1) Your weight
2) The speed that you run on the treadmill
3) The distance that you run on the treadmill
4) The gradient that you run on the treadmill
 
To make this info super easy to digest, I’ve used this treadmill calorie calculator to create a simple table which breaks down exactly how far and how fast you need to run, in order to hit the 1000 calorie mark. It includes weight, speed and distance data. All the info is calculated with a treadmill gradient of 0%, mainly to make the table easy to read, and because a lot of people run on this setting.
 

Speed

Time

Distance

Calories

150 lbs

5 mp/h

97 minutes

8.1 miles

1003

150 lbs

7 mp/h

72 minutes

8.4 miles

1006

150 lbs

9 mp/h

57 minutes

8.6 miles

1011

160 lbs

5 mp/h

91 minutes

7.6 miles

1004

160 lbs

7 mp/h

67 minutes

7.9 miles

1010

160 lbs

9 mp/h

53 minutes

8.0 miles

1003

170 lbs

5 mp/h

86 minutes

7.2 miles

1011

170 lbs

7 mp/h

63 minutes

7.4 miles

1005

170 lbs

9 mp/h

50 minutes

7.6 miles

1012

180 lbs

5 mp/h

81 minutes

6.8 miles

1011

180 lbs

7 mp/h

60 minutes

7.0 miles

1006

180 lbs

9 mp/h

47 minutes

7.1 miles

1001

190 lbs

5 mp/h

76 minutes

6.4 miles

1004

190 lbs

7 mp/h

56 minutes

6.6 miles

1002

190 lbs

9 mp/h

45 minutes

6.8 miles

1012

200 lbs

5 mp/h

73 minutes

6.1 miles

1008

200 lbs

7 mp/h

54 minutes

6.3 miles

1006

200 lbs

9 mp/h

42 minutes

6.4 miles

1003

210 lbs

5 mp/h

69 minutes

5.8 miles

1006

210 lbs

7 mp/h

51 minutes

6.0 miles

1006

210 lbs

9 mp/h

40 minutes

6.1 miles

1004

220 lbs

5 mp/h

67 minutes

5.6 miles

1018

220 lbs

7 mp/h

49 minutes

5.7 miles

1002

220 lbs

9 mp/h

39 minutes

5.8 miles

1000

Two things to note from the table above

1) Heavier people burn a lot more calories than lighter people – For instance, a 220 pound person only needs to cover 5.7 miles when running at 7mp/h. This is very different from a 150 pound person that needs to cover a whopping 8.4 miles when running at the same speed. 

I think this is actually quite encouraging for people who are a bit heavier. It should be motivating to know that if you weigh more than 200 pounds, every mile you cover burns over over 170 calories.

2) The faster you run the less time it takes – If running at 5mp/h, it will take a 180 pound person 81 minutes to cross the 1k calorie mark. If that same person bumps their speed up to 9mp/h, the time needed drops to 47 minutes. That’s almost half the time to achieve the same goal. So if you want to burn 1000 calories as quickly as you can, running fast is the answer.

 

Is it necessary to burn 1000 calories to lose weight?

Definitely not. In my opinion, the simplest way to lose weight is to burn 500 calories through cardiovascular exercise (like running) and then reduce your calorie intake by 300 calories. 

This is a more achievable target for most people. It doesn’t require a drastic shift to your diet, it can be done in less than 45 minutes, and it works out to 800 calories in total. Consistently creating a calorific deficit of 800 calories will help you drop weight super fast.  
 
With that being said, if you want to lose weight without changing your diet, burning 1000 calories during your training sessions can definitely help. The bigger question is whether or not it is sustainable for you to burn so many calories every time you train. Doing this every day could easily lead to burnout or injury, so if you are going to set this challenge for yourself, it’s probably best to only do it once or twice a week, max. 
 

Are there any lessons to be learned here?

Lesson 1 –  You need to cover a substantial distance in order to burn 1000 calories. For most people, it works out to 6 miles or more. This is not a small distance by any means. It still amazes me to think that even if I run a sub 40 minute 10k (as a 180 pound person), I won’t break the 1000 calorie mark. 

Lesson 2 – If you haven’t run 10k’s before, give yourself time to build the fitness needed to burn 1000 calories on a treadmill. You can’t just jump from 4 mile runs to 8 mile runs overnight. It’s a perfectly healthy goal to set for yourself, but you must be patient and learn to appreciate the process of improving your stamina and fitness over time. 

 

The Foolproof Strategy For Burning 1000 Calories on a Treadmill

Once you know the exact distance you need to run (use the table at the top of this post for a quick guide), the best thing is to work up to that distance in 0.5 mile increments. So if your current max distance is 5 miles and you need to get to 8 miles, your plan would like like this.
 
  • Session 1 Goal: 5.5 miles
  • Session 2 Goal: 6 miles
  • Session 3 Goal: 6.5 miles
  • Session 4 Goal: 7 miles
  • Session 5 Goal: 7.5 miles
  • Session 6 Goal: 8 miles
I would strongly advise taking at least one day of rest between these sessions. You don’t want to get carried away and then get injured. 

 

Personal Attempt To Burn 1000 Calories

I like to practice what I preach, so rather than simply writing an article, I set myself the challenge of burning 1000 calories on the Treadmill at my local Virgin Active. I have to admit that my initial plan was to smash this goal on my first attempt. Let’s just say that I was a little bit over ambitious 😳

 

1st Attempt Summary: "You're only halfway there mate!"

Like I said, I wasn’t expecting to feel so gassed by the 5km mark, and might have overestimated by my current fitness levels. 

2nd Attempt Summary: Baby Steps Brother

True to my word, I am now tackling this particular challenge, step by step and stride by stride. I know that my current max distance on a treadmill is about 5 miles, so the the next goal is to get to 5.5 miles. I am essentially following the advice outlined in the foolproof strategy above. 

Final Thoughts

Don’t be fooled by the seeming simplicity of burning 1000 calories on a treadmill. I’m a reasonably fit dude that can run sub 20 minute 5k’s without blinking. I have been humbled by the endurance fitness needed to actually conquer this beast. 

To close, all I really want to say is that burning 1000 calories on a treadmill is a super fun challenge to set for yourself. In fact, it’s probably the simplest way to prepare for a 10k race. My only hope is that you give yourself the time and patience to build the fitness needed conquer this challenge.

 If you do, you could become a 1000 calorie treadmill champion. It’s an honorable achievement that will make you a better long distance runner and could help you drop a few pant sizes in the process. Sounds like a pretty sweet deal to me 😎.

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